Haibun Exemplars

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Exemplars: What are they? Why are they here?

The Rogue River falls shown above is, in my estimation, nature’s exemplar of a waterfall. I’d also like to say that it’s a photographic exemplar, aka an excellent photograph, but for that it’s my own shot of the falls. Thus someone else will have to praise it or buy it or publish it for it to approach the lofty rank of exemplar.

On this page, over time, I’ll post a number of haibun by writers other than myself that in my view are both well done and help to show the variety of styles that represent contemporary English-language haibun.

For some of these exemplars, I’ll offer commentaries – close readings to explore what makes them work well enough to have been published by a journal editor.

Of course, my tastes in this selection are showing, which is why I think it’s important to post published works where an editor independent of the writer saw fit to select the piece for the enjoyment of his or her readers.

If you read any of these, please use the comments window where they appear to tell me what you think of them and a bit about why.


Haibun Titles are Important!

Very little has been done in the way of informed critical study of the haibun form, particularly when compared with the number of haiku studies.

While there’s been a good deal of emphasis in haibun about the importance of the link between the haibun’s prose and the link-shift with it’s important little sidekick, the haiku, almost nothing has been explored about how a haibun title might similarly link-shift with the haibun prose and haiku.

This is strange because in most other writing genres, there’s a good deal of information about the importance of titles and how to create a good one.

Read more to explore why titles make a difference and the options open to haibun poets -> The Importance of Titles in Haibun